FutureChina Global Forum 2014

Day 1, Thursday 17 July 2014
0800hrs – 0900hrs Registration
0900hrs – 0910hrs Welcome and Opening Remarks

0910hrs – 1030hrs

 

Opening plenary session
A growing China in an evolving region: Seeking win-win partnerships

Emerging as the world’s second largest economy, China is progressing from being a rule taker to becoming a rule maker. As Asia and the world enter into a new era of increased economic integration, China is bound to play a bigger role in setting global governance rules, and shaping Asia’s evolution. 
Following the end of the Third Plenum last November, reforms covering six areas, including economic, social, political, cultural, ecological, and state security, have been proposed as part of the central leadership’s bold attempt to quicken the tempo of economic reform and arrest a slowdown in its economy. Market and institutional changes, coupled with an increasingly connected community, have also seen capitalism bubbling from the bottom up amidst China’s economic transformation. 
  • How will China’s economic slowdown impact other Asian countries and what should be done to alleviate this potential impact?
  • In what ways could the growing economic interaction between Asian countries and China contribute to the rebalancing of China’s economy towards a more sustainable growth model from which all Asian countries could benefit?
  • Singapore and Hong Kong have been two very important hubs – although in different ways – in terms of easy access channels to business with and in China. How could this role continue to remain relevant as China’s economy continues to mature? 
  • What key elements in China’s regional economic strategy could ensure peaceful and steady economic integration in an evolving Asia?
  • How should Singapore position itself to ensure that we continue to ride the China wave and stay ahead of the race? 
Keynote Speakers:
GOH Chok Tong 吴作栋, Emeritus Senior Minister and Senior Advisor, Monetary Authority of Singapore, Singapore
ZENG Peiyan 曾培炎, Vice Chairman, Boao Forum for Asia; Chairman, China Center for International Economic Exchanges and Former Vice Premier, People’s Republic of China
 
Panelists:
LEE Yi Shyan 李奕贤, Senior Minister of State, Ministry of Trade and Industry, Ministry of National Development and Board Director, Business China, Singapore
ZHANG Xiaoqiang 张晓强Executive Vice Chairman, China Center for International Economic Exchanges, People’s Republic of China
 
Moderated by:
HEE Theng Fong 许廷芳, Consultant, Civil & Commercial Litigation, Harry Elias Partnership LLP and Board Director, Business China, Singapore 
 
1030hrs – 1100hrs Networking break  

1100hrs – 1215hrs

 

Panel discussion
Looking at China's growth over the next 18 months
 
While decision makers and economic observers agree that the era of double digit growth might be over for China, the key question is at what level of sustainable growth will the country be able to stabilize its trajectory in the coming years. The IMF is forecasting China GDP growth to be at 7.5% in 2014-2015. However, there are other key factors of consideration:
  • What will domestic consumption evolve as a growth driver?
  • To what extent will the economic recovery of the US and Europe markets have an impact on China’s economic performance?
  • How will Beijing effectively control the real estate sector without risking a sharp slowdown in economic activity?
Panelists:
HU Yifan 胡一帆Managing Director, Chief Economist & Head of Research, Haitong International, Hong Kong SAR
LI Wei 李炜, Economist, Standard Chartered Bank (China) Limited, People's Republic of China
SHEN Minggao 沈明高Managing Director, Head of China Research, Greater China Chief Economist, Citigroup Global Markets Asia Limited, Hong Kong SAR
Guy STEAR 石凯, Head of Research, Asia, Société Générale, Hong Kong SAR
 
Moderated by:
YANG Yanqing 杨燕青, Deputy Editor-in-Chief, China Business News, People's Republic of China
 

1100hrs – 1215hrs

 

Panel discussion
What are the prospects for growth in the private sector?
 
The Third Plenum of China’s Communist Party last November pledged to give a “decisive role” to market competition in the economy. This should pave the way for an accelerated development of the private sector which is the main source of growth and jobs creation.
  • What will be the extent of the policy shift resulting from a more decisive role for the free markets?
  • How will this translate to better credit access and other resources for the private sector?
  • What are the prospects of opening up sectors that are currently dominated by SOEs to the private sector?
  • What are some possible economic drivers that could propel a greater role for the private sector? 
Panelists:
Angela LIU 刘畅, Chairman, New Hope Liuhe Co Ltd, People’s Republic of China
Sukanto TANOTO 陈江和, Founder and Chairman, RGE Pte Ltd, Singapore
TENG Bingsheng 滕斌圣, Associate Professor, Strategic Management & Associate Dean, European Campus, Cheung Kong Graduate School of Business, People’s Republic of China
YANG Zheyu 杨哲宇, Desk Chief, Caixin Media Group and Deputy Editor, China Reform, People’s Republic of China
 
Moderated by:
George CHEN 陈澍, Financial Editor, South China Morning Post, Hong Kong SAR
 

1230hrs – 1415hrs

 

Plenary lunch
China's impact on reshaping the global telecom industry

The global telecom industry is facing multiple challenges including rising demand for increased connectivity, security issues, the need for continuous innovation in networks and devices, and the management of regulatory issues. With over a billion mobile phones in use, half a billion mobile web users and 618 million Internet users, global telecom giants such as Huawei,  China is both a significant market and shaper of things to come.  How are Chinese companies contributing to re-shape the global telecom landscape? Which markets are key for the future?
 
Keynote Speaker:
GUO Ping 郭平Deputy Chairman of the Board & Rotating CEO, Huawei Technologies Co Ltd, People’s Republic of China
 
Moderated by:
WOO Keng Choong 胡敬中, Deputy Chief Editor, Chinese Current Affairs, MediaCorp, Singapore
 

1430hrs – 1545hrs

 

Panel discussion
To what extent is the rebalancing of China’s economy actually happening? What does it mean for longer-term prospects?
 
We cannot underestimate the difficulties involved in shifting from a growth model based on exports, heavy capital investment, labor intensive and high environmental costs activities to a model that is more reliant on domestic consumption (which only makes up 35% of GDP currently), knowledge-based and technology driven activities. While Beijing has officially set a new course for its economy, many difficulties remain as slowing down investment without creating a sharp deceleration is a balancing act, and some provinces are still reluctant to align themselves to this policy lest it would mean a slowdown for them.
  • Are we able to discern initial results of the rebalancing strategy that Beijing intends to undertake?
  • What are the major risks and uncertainties involved in the rebalancing strategy amid a global economy that remains volatile?
  • What are the key indicators to watch for in order to assess how the rebalancing strategy is panning out?
Panelists:
FU Jun 傅军, Executive Dean & Professor, School of Government, Peking University, People’s Republic of China
Michael PETTIS, Professor of International Finance, Guanghua School of Management, Peking University and Senior Associate, Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, People’s Republic of China
WANG Jianye 王建业, Visiting Professor of Economics and Director, Volatility Institute, NYU Shanghai, People's Republic of China
XIANG Bing 项兵, Founding Dean and Professor of China Business and Globalization, Cheung Kong Graduate School of Business, People’s Republic of China
 
Moderated by:
George CHEN 陈澍, Financial Editor, South China Morning Post, Hong Kong SAR
 

1430hrs – 1545hrs

 

Panel discussion 
The Chinese consumer: A profile in transition
 
China now views domestic consumption as a key engine for growth. Increasing disposable incomes and the rise of consumerism in China have resulted in consumers who are more discerning, brand-conscious and sophisticated. While private consumption currently accounts for only 35-36% of GDP, this percentage is bound to increase in the coming years as the development of healthcare and pension systems could potentially encourage citizens to save less for retirement. Rising wages and an ageing population are also shifting the balance towards more consumption.
  • What are the key categories of Chinese consumers?
  • What are the needs and aspirations that are shaping consumption trends?
  • How will the competition develop between local brands and foreign ones in meeting fast-evolving consumer expectations and aspirations?
Panelists:
CHI Fulin 迟福林, President, China Institute for Reform and Development, People’s Republic of China
Tom DOCTOROFF 唐锐涛, APAC CEO, JWT Shanghai, People’s Republic of China
Karl GERTH 葛凯, Professor & Hsiu Endowed Chair in Chinese Studies, Department of History, University of California, San Diego, United States of America
MAO Jihong 毛继鸿, Founder of EXCEPTION de MIXMIND, FangSuo Commune, YNOT, President of Mixmind Art & Design Co Ltd and Vice President of China National Garment Association, People's Republic of China
 
Moderated by:
Yaël SMADJA, President, Smadja & Smadja USA Inc, United States of America
 
1545hrs – 1615hrs Networking break

1615hrs – 1730hrs

 

Panel discussion
What is on the mind of China’s new generation?

The mindsets and aspirations of China’s new generation are probably among the key issues that are constantly on the minds of the leadership in Beijing. China now has more graduates than ever before, and everyone is hoping to get on the fast lane for a better life. Whether the younger generation will subscribe to the China dream that Xi Jinping is promoting remains a question to be answered.
 
This is the “I want more, and I want it now” generation and the way its aspirations and expectations are evolving will have a growing impact on both social and political stability. A conversation with three young Chinese will help us to understand better their aspirations and views on the future and evolution of their country, their global outlook as well as the corresponding impact on their lives.
 
Panelists:
GE Yang 戈扬, Content Planner of Conference and Events, FTChinese.com, People’s Republic of China
Paul QI, Columnist, Hexun.com, People’s Republic of China
ZHANG Tuo 张拓, Founder & CEO, iguanzhong.com, People’s Republic of China
 
Moderated by:
Jeffrey LEHMAN 雷蒙, Founding Vice Chancellor, New York University Shanghai, People's Republic of China
 

1615hrs – 1730hrs

 

Panel discussion
Foreign companies: Learning to tread a trickier path
 
Most foreign companies operating in China may have experienced a tougher working environment due to tighter scrutiny from the authorities, a more stringent regulatory framework as well as increasing costs as a result of stronger competition from local companies. However, the China market remains crucial for most multinational corporations and will have to learn to tread a trickier path:
  • What adjustments would foreign companies need to make in view of the new environment?
  • Are foreign companies now faced with a “more pain, less gain” period or is the overall picture more complex than that? 
Panelists:
Peter ARKELL 戴碧特, Chairman of the Board, Australia Chamber of Commerce in Shanghai & Managing Director, Asia, Swann Global, People’s Republic of China
Mark DUVAL 杜骁勇, President, American Chamber of Commerce in China, People’s Republic of China
Brendan MASONGeneral Manager, Greater China, Cochlear Limited, People's Republic of China
Timothy STRATFORD 夏尊恩, Managing Partner, Covington and Burling LLP (Beijing Office), People's Republic of China
TAN Teck Long 陈德隆, Managing Director & Head of Institutional Banking Group, DBS Bank (China) Limited, People’s Republic of China
 
Moderated by:
David SCHLESINGER 史进德, Managing Director, Tripod Advisors, Hong Kong SAR
 

1745hrs – 1900hrs

 

Panel discussion
What are the next steps for China’s high-tech sector?
 
Over the last 12 years, China’s share of global high tech manufacturing has increased from 8% to about 25% – almost as much as that of the US market. Cloud computing, software, smart phones, E-Commerce, clean technology, healthcare and bio-tech are some examples of the high-tech industries booming in China despite the economic slowdown. New tech districts are now emerging beyond Beijing, Shanghai or Shenzhen.
  • Could a shortage of talent prove to be the bottleneck for the development of the high tech sector?
  • Will China be able to develop the institutional and industrial structures that can sustain innovation capabilities and develop new innovations and products that are sold on global markets?
  • In which high-tech segments would China stand the greatest chance of achieving a leadership position in the coming decade? 
Panelists:
Rameshbabu SONGUKRISHNASAMY 宋乐施Vice President & General Manager, Honeywell Technology Solutions China, People’s Republic of China
WANG Hao 王昊, CEO, Xtron Inc (Huanteng Smart), People’s Republic of China
XU Songming 徐松明, Vice General Manager, Shenzhen Special Economic Zone Construction and Development Group, People’s Republic of China
Nick YANG 杨宁Co-Founder, KongZhong, People's Republic of China
 
Moderated by:
TAN Yinglan 陈映岚, Venture Partner, Sequoia Capital, Singapore
 

1745hrs – 1830hrs

 

Panel discussion
A view of the power landscape in Beijing

There has been a marked tightening of political control since the change of leadership in Beijing led by Xi Jinping. The optimistic interpretation for this is that economic reforms in China are always accompanied by tighter control as the leadership wants to make sure that things will remain within set limits; the pessimistic interpretation of what is happening reflects the traditional emphasis on control in Beijing especially in periods of uncertainty.
  • How should we read the political evolution in China?
  • To what extent is the tightening of control an expression of the leadership’s concern about growing social frustrations and the impact of social media?
  • To what extent can the combination of economic reform and political tightening be sustained?
Panelists:
Christopher JOHNSON 张克斯, Senior Advisor & Freeman Chair in China Studies, Center for Strategic & International Studies, United States of America
Benjamin LIM 林洸耀, North Asia Specialist Correspondent, Reuters News, Thomson Reuters
Orville SCHELL 夏伟, Arthur Ross Director, Center on US-China Relations, The Asia Society, United States of America
 
Moderated by:
Claude SMADJA, President, Smadja & Smadja, Strategic Advisory Inc, Switzerland
 
1830hrs – 2000hrs Cocktail Reception

2000hrs – 2200hrs

 

Dinner Dialogue
 
Distinguished Speaker:
LEE Hsien Loong 李显龙, Prime Minister, Singapore
 
Moderated by:
GOH Sin Teck 吴新迪, Editor, Lianhe Zaobao, Singapore Press Holdings Limited, Singapore
 
Day 2, Friday 18 July 2014
0800hrs – 0900hrs Registration
0900hrs – 0910hrs Welcome and Opening Remarks

0910hrs – 1030hrs

 

Opening plenary session
A growing China in an evolving region: Seeking win-win partnerships

Emerging as the world’s second largest economy, China is progressing from being a rule taker to becoming a rule maker. As Asia and the world enter into a new era of increased economic integration, China is bound to play a bigger role in setting global governance rules, and shaping Asia’s evolution. 
Following the end of the Third Plenum last November, reforms covering six areas, including economic, social, political, cultural, ecological, and state security, have been proposed as part of the central leadership’s bold attempt to quicken the tempo of economic reform and arrest a slowdown in its economy. Market and institutional changes, coupled with an increasingly connected community, have also seen capitalism bubbling from the bottom up amidst China’s economic transformation. 
  • How will China’s economic slowdown impact other Asian countries and what should be done to alleviate this potential impact?
  • In what ways could the growing economic interaction between Asian countries and China contribute to the rebalancing of China’s economy towards a more sustainable growth model from which all Asian countries could benefit?
  • Singapore and Hong Kong have been two very important hubs – although in different ways – in terms of easy access channels to business with and in China. How could this role continue to remain relevant as China’s economy continues to mature? 
  • What key elements in China’s regional economic strategy could ensure peaceful and steady economic integration in an evolving Asia?
  • How should Singapore position itself to ensure that we continue to ride the China wave and stay ahead of the race? 
Keynote Speakers:
GOH Chok Tong 吴作栋, Emeritus Senior Minister and Senior Advisor, Monetary Authority of Singapore, Singapore
ZENG Peiyan 曾培炎, Vice Chairman, Boao Forum for Asia; Chairman, China Center for International Economic Exchanges and Former Vice Premier, People’s Republic of China
 
Panelists:
LEE Yi Shyan 李奕贤, Senior Minister of State, Ministry of Trade and Industry, Ministry of National Development and Board Director, Business China, Singapore
ZHANG Xiaoqiang 张晓强Executive Vice Chairman, China Center for International Economic Exchanges, People’s Republic of China
 
Moderated by:
HEE Theng Fong 许廷芳, Consultant, Civil & Commercial Litigation, Harry Elias Partnership LLP and Board Director, Business China, Singapore 
 
1030hrs – 1100hrs Networking break  

1100hrs – 1215hrs

 

Panel discussion
Looking at China's growth over the next 18 months
 
While decision makers and economic observers agree that the era of double digit growth might be over for China, the key question is at what level of sustainable growth will the country be able to stabilize its trajectory in the coming years. The IMF is forecasting China GDP growth to be at 7.5% in 2014-2015. However, there are other key factors of consideration:
  • What will domestic consumption evolve as a growth driver?
  • To what extent will the economic recovery of the US and Europe markets have an impact on China’s economic performance?
  • How will Beijing effectively control the real estate sector without risking a sharp slowdown in economic activity?
Panelists:
HU Yifan 胡一帆Managing Director, Chief Economist & Head of Research, Haitong International, Hong Kong SAR
LI Wei 李炜, Economist, Standard Chartered Bank (China) Limited, People's Republic of China
SHEN Minggao 沈明高Managing Director, Head of China Research, Greater China Chief Economist, Citigroup Global Markets Asia Limited, Hong Kong SAR
Guy STEAR 石凯, Head of Research, Asia, Société Générale, Hong Kong SAR
 
Moderated by:
YANG Yanqing 杨燕青, Deputy Editor-in-Chief, China Business News, People's Republic of China
 

1100hrs – 1215hrs

 

Panel discussion
What are the prospects for growth in the private sector?
 
The Third Plenum of China’s Communist Party last November pledged to give a “decisive role” to market competition in the economy. This should pave the way for an accelerated development of the private sector which is the main source of growth and jobs creation.
  • What will be the extent of the policy shift resulting from a more decisive role for the free markets?
  • How will this translate to better credit access and other resources for the private sector?
  • What are the prospects of opening up sectors that are currently dominated by SOEs to the private sector?
  • What are some possible economic drivers that could propel a greater role for the private sector? 
Panelists:
Angela LIU 刘畅, Chairman, New Hope Liuhe Co Ltd, People’s Republic of China
Sukanto TANOTO 陈江和, Founder and Chairman, RGE Pte Ltd, Singapore
TENG Bingsheng 滕斌圣, Associate Professor, Strategic Management & Associate Dean, European Campus, Cheung Kong Graduate School of Business, People’s Republic of China
YANG Zheyu 杨哲宇, Desk Chief, Caixin Media Group and Deputy Editor, China Reform, People’s Republic of China
 
Moderated by:
George CHEN 陈澍, Financial Editor, South China Morning Post, Hong Kong SAR
 

1230hrs – 1415hrs

 

Plenary lunch
China's impact on reshaping the global telecom industry

The global telecom industry is facing multiple challenges including rising demand for increased connectivity, security issues, the need for continuous innovation in networks and devices, and the management of regulatory issues. With over a billion mobile phones in use, half a billion mobile web users and 618 million Internet users, global telecom giants such as Huawei,  China is both a significant market and shaper of things to come.  How are Chinese companies contributing to re-shape the global telecom landscape? Which markets are key for the future?
 
Keynote Speaker:
GUO Ping 郭平Deputy Chairman of the Board & Rotating CEO, Huawei Technologies Co Ltd, People’s Republic of China
 
Moderated by:
WOO Keng Choong 胡敬中, Deputy Chief Editor, Chinese Current Affairs, MediaCorp, Singapore
 

1430hrs – 1545hrs

 

Panel discussion
To what extent is the rebalancing of China’s economy actually happening? What does it mean for longer-term prospects?
 
We cannot underestimate the difficulties involved in shifting from a growth model based on exports, heavy capital investment, labor intensive and high environmental costs activities to a model that is more reliant on domestic consumption (which only makes up 35% of GDP currently), knowledge-based and technology driven activities. While Beijing has officially set a new course for its economy, many difficulties remain as slowing down investment without creating a sharp deceleration is a balancing act, and some provinces are still reluctant to align themselves to this policy lest it would mean a slowdown for them.
  • Are we able to discern initial results of the rebalancing strategy that Beijing intends to undertake?
  • What are the major risks and uncertainties involved in the rebalancing strategy amid a global economy that remains volatile?
  • What are the key indicators to watch for in order to assess how the rebalancing strategy is panning out?
Panelists:
FU Jun 傅军, Executive Dean & Professor, School of Government, Peking University, People’s Republic of China
Michael PETTIS, Professor of International Finance, Guanghua School of Management, Peking University and Senior Associate, Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, People’s Republic of China
WANG Jianye 王建业, Visiting Professor of Economics and Director, Volatility Institute, NYU Shanghai, People's Republic of China
XIANG Bing 项兵, Founding Dean and Professor of China Business and Globalization, Cheung Kong Graduate School of Business, People’s Republic of China
 
Moderated by:
George CHEN 陈澍, Financial Editor, South China Morning Post, Hong Kong SAR
 

1430hrs – 1545hrs

 

Panel discussion 
The Chinese consumer: A profile in transition
 
China now views domestic consumption as a key engine for growth. Increasing disposable incomes and the rise of consumerism in China have resulted in consumers who are more discerning, brand-conscious and sophisticated. While private consumption currently accounts for only 35-36% of GDP, this percentage is bound to increase in the coming years as the development of healthcare and pension systems could potentially encourage citizens to save less for retirement. Rising wages and an ageing population are also shifting the balance towards more consumption.
  • What are the key categories of Chinese consumers?
  • What are the needs and aspirations that are shaping consumption trends?
  • How will the competition develop between local brands and foreign ones in meeting fast-evolving consumer expectations and aspirations?
Panelists:
CHI Fulin 迟福林, President, China Institute for Reform and Development, People’s Republic of China
Tom DOCTOROFF 唐锐涛, APAC CEO, JWT Shanghai, People’s Republic of China
Karl GERTH 葛凯, Professor & Hsiu Endowed Chair in Chinese Studies, Department of History, University of California, San Diego, United States of America
MAO Jihong 毛继鸿, Founder of EXCEPTION de MIXMIND, FangSuo Commune, YNOT, President of Mixmind Art & Design Co Ltd and Vice President of China National Garment Association, People's Republic of China
 
Moderated by:
Yaël SMADJA, President, Smadja & Smadja USA Inc, United States of America
 
1545hrs – 1615hrs Networking break

1615hrs – 1730hrs

 

Panel discussion
What is on the mind of China’s new generation?

The mindsets and aspirations of China’s new generation are probably among the key issues that are constantly on the minds of the leadership in Beijing. China now has more graduates than ever before, and everyone is hoping to get on the fast lane for a better life. Whether the younger generation will subscribe to the China dream that Xi Jinping is promoting remains a question to be answered.
 
This is the “I want more, and I want it now” generation and the way its aspirations and expectations are evolving will have a growing impact on both social and political stability. A conversation with three young Chinese will help us to understand better their aspirations and views on the future and evolution of their country, their global outlook as well as the corresponding impact on their lives.
 
Panelists:
GE Yang 戈扬, Content Planner of Conference and Events, FTChinese.com, People’s Republic of China
Paul QI, Columnist, Hexun.com, People’s Republic of China
ZHANG Tuo 张拓, Founder & CEO, iguanzhong.com, People’s Republic of China
 
Moderated by:
Jeffrey LEHMAN 雷蒙, Founding Vice Chancellor, New York University Shanghai, People's Republic of China
 

1615hrs – 1730hrs

 

Panel discussion
Foreign companies: Learning to tread a trickier path
 
Most foreign companies operating in China may have experienced a tougher working environment due to tighter scrutiny from the authorities, a more stringent regulatory framework as well as increasing costs as a result of stronger competition from local companies. However, the China market remains crucial for most multinational corporations and will have to learn to tread a trickier path:
  • What adjustments would foreign companies need to make in view of the new environment?
  • Are foreign companies now faced with a “more pain, less gain” period or is the overall picture more complex than that? 
Panelists:
Peter ARKELL 戴碧特, Chairman of the Board, Australia Chamber of Commerce in Shanghai & Managing Director, Asia, Swann Global, People’s Republic of China
Mark DUVAL 杜骁勇, President, American Chamber of Commerce in China, People’s Republic of China
Brendan MASONGeneral Manager, Greater China, Cochlear Limited, People's Republic of China
Timothy STRATFORD 夏尊恩, Managing Partner, Covington and Burling LLP (Beijing Office), People's Republic of China
TAN Teck Long 陈德隆, Managing Director & Head of Institutional Banking Group, DBS Bank (China) Limited, People’s Republic of China
 
Moderated by:
David SCHLESINGER 史进德, Managing Director, Tripod Advisors, Hong Kong SAR
 

1745hrs – 1900hrs

 

Panel discussion
What are the next steps for China’s high-tech sector?
 
Over the last 12 years, China’s share of global high tech manufacturing has increased from 8% to about 25% – almost as much as that of the US market. Cloud computing, software, smart phones, E-Commerce, clean technology, healthcare and bio-tech are some examples of the high-tech industries booming in China despite the economic slowdown. New tech districts are now emerging beyond Beijing, Shanghai or Shenzhen.
  • Could a shortage of talent prove to be the bottleneck for the development of the high tech sector?
  • Will China be able to develop the institutional and industrial structures that can sustain innovation capabilities and develop new innovations and products that are sold on global markets?
  • In which high-tech segments would China stand the greatest chance of achieving a leadership position in the coming decade? 
Panelists:
Rameshbabu SONGUKRISHNASAMY 宋乐施Vice President & General Manager, Honeywell Technology Solutions China, People’s Republic of China
WANG Hao 王昊, CEO, Xtron Inc (Huanteng Smart), People’s Republic of China
XU Songming 徐松明, Vice General Manager, Shenzhen Special Economic Zone Construction and Development Group, People’s Republic of China
Nick YANG 杨宁Co-Founder, KongZhong, People's Republic of China
 
Moderated by:
TAN Yinglan 陈映岚, Venture Partner, Sequoia Capital, Singapore
 

1745hrs – 1830hrs

 

Panel discussion
A view of the power landscape in Beijing

There has been a marked tightening of political control since the change of leadership in Beijing led by Xi Jinping. The optimistic interpretation for this is that economic reforms in China are always accompanied by tighter control as the leadership wants to make sure that things will remain within set limits; the pessimistic interpretation of what is happening reflects the traditional emphasis on control in Beijing especially in periods of uncertainty.
  • How should we read the political evolution in China?
  • To what extent is the tightening of control an expression of the leadership’s concern about growing social frustrations and the impact of social media?
  • To what extent can the combination of economic reform and political tightening be sustained?
Panelists:
Christopher JOHNSON 张克斯, Senior Advisor & Freeman Chair in China Studies, Center for Strategic & International Studies, United States of America
Benjamin LIM 林洸耀, North Asia Specialist Correspondent, Reuters News, Thomson Reuters
Orville SCHELL 夏伟, Arthur Ross Director, Center on US-China Relations, The Asia Society, United States of America
 
Moderated by:
Claude SMADJA, President, Smadja & Smadja, Strategic Advisory Inc, Switzerland
 
1830hrs – 2000hrs Cocktail Reception

2000hrs – 2200hrs

 

Dinner Dialogue
 
Distinguished Speaker:
LEE Hsien Loong 李显龙, Prime Minister, Singapore
 
Moderated by:
GOH Sin Teck 吴新迪, Editor, Lianhe Zaobao, Singapore Press Holdings Limited, Singapore
 

Others

Download Session Highlights from Day 1, 17 July
Download Session Highlights from Day 2, 18 July
Download Riding The Wave Of A Globalising China
Download FutureChina Global Forum 2014 Media Report


Event Report

Please email us at enquiries@futurechina.sg for 2014 Event Report.